Archive | Other Places Other Eras

A map of the ever shrinking circumference of childhood, from The Daily Mail.

How Children Lost the Right to Roam in Just 4 Generations

This Daily Mail piece by David Derbyshire is so profound it has been cited over and over: How Children Lost the Right to Roam in Four Generations: an interview with four generations of the same family about how far they were allowed to wander as kids. It comes from Britain but will sound familiar to […]

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Why did we stop letting you do this?

Spain to Parents: Let Your 6-Year-Olds Walk to School!

Kids age 6 are old enough to walk themselves to school, Spanish officials are telling parents. A seven-community experiment begun there in 2010 has been hailed as a success by researchers who say that allowing first graders to walk without adult supervision “builds their self-confidence.” According to this piece in The Washington Post by Rick […]

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Arrest all the moms? Or try to bring back an era when we trusted each other?

We Weren’t Always Obsessed with Child Abduction

Here’s a photo from Britain, where it was once absolutely common to let your kids wait in their buggies while you went shopping. Isn’t it odd the way what’s normal in one era seems nutty in another, even though the world has not changed that much — just our perceptions of it? (Here are some […]

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Curious George and the healthy treat. Kids are gonna love this one!

Happy Birthday, Formerly Curious George

. When Curious George was born 75 years ago this month, his German Jewish parents, H.A. and Margaret Rey, were fleeing the Nazis. They took George with them, in the form of a manuscript. As Alison Lobron notes in The Boston Globe: Three generations children have grown up with Curious George, who celebrates his 75th birthday […]

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Hey! That's only in "Cleaning Room Tutorial"

Our Kids are NOT a Report Card on Our Parenting

. There have been a spate of, “What I Learned about Parenting by Living in Country X” articles. Most of them are pretty interesting.  The French, Japanese, Scandinavians — they all do it differently from us, and usually the biggest difference is less hovering/handwringing. This piece by Mihal Greener in Salon adds one angle I […]

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